History Tells Our Stories

In Every War for Our Country                                                                                                  Our Men and Our Women

Mirror To America

John Hope Franklin

Having Our Say

Sarah and Elizabeth Delaney

 

When We Were Colored

Eva Rutland

Extraordinary, Ordinary People

Condoleezza Rice

Telling Our Story

The African Americans

Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Revolutionary War

Crispus Attucks Revolutionary War

Korea

Revolutionary War

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We've Pledged Allegiance

Susie Taylor Civil War Nurse

Cathay Williams Buffalo Soldier

WAAC

Susie Taylor Civil War Nurse

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Black American soldiers have fought in every war the United States has participated in, including the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Mexican War,  the Civil War, the Indian Wars, the Spanish American War, the Philippine-American War, the Second Italo-Abyssinian War, the Spanish Civil War, World Wars I and II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Gulf War and the current war on terror.  

Fifteen Black American soldiers were awarded the Medal of Honor for their actions in the Civil War.

Black women proved to be as dedicated and brave as any other American serving in most US campaigns from the Revolutionary War to our current conflicts. Women primarily served in support and nursing jobs. During the Civil war there were several noted spies for the Union forces. During WW II, Black women were able to distinguish themselves in many wartime capacities including as Tuskegee soldiers.  

In World War II, more than 2.5 million Black Americans registered for service, but only 1 million actually served.

 

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                     At War                                                                                                                                       At Home

 Tuskegee Airmen - American Heros                 Early Black Military Officers                                  Black American Riveters 

Buffalo Soldiers

BIRE mil 4.jpg
BIRE mil 4.jpg

Capt. OSB Wall Civil War

Henry Ossian Flipper West Point Grad

Col Benjamin O Davis Sr

Gen Hazel W. Johnson- Brown

Capt. Joan C. Bynum

Benjamin Davis, Jr.

Major Charity Adams

Lt. Willa Beatrice Brown

Nannie Helen Burroughs 1879

Nannie Helen Burroughs 1879

In 1908, she opened the National Training School for Women and Girls in Washington, DC. Her curriculum emphasized vocational training, offering classes in domestic science, missionary work, social work, home nursing, clerical work, printing, dressmaking, beauty culture, shoe repair, and agriculture. There were also classes in grammar, English literature, Latin, drama, public speaking, music, and physical education. She required all student to take a course in Black history.

James McCune Smith 1813

James McCune Smith 1813

First US Black Medical Doctor. Graduated from the University of Glasgow top of his class in 1837. Denied entry to Columbia University Medical School and Geneva Medical College due to his race.

Charlotte E. Ray 1850

Charlotte E. Ray 1850

First Black woman lawyer in the USA. Graduated from the Howard University School of Law in 1872.

Wentworth Cheswell 1746

Wentworth Cheswell 1746

First Black American elected to public office. In 1768, he was elected town constable in Newmarket, New Hampshire

Bass Reeves 1838

Bass Reeves 1838

The original "Lone Ranger." First Black Deputy U.S. Marshals west of the Mississippi River. He arrested over 3,000 felons and shot and killed fourteen outlaws in self-defense. The popular radio and tv stories are based on his life.

Alice Coachman 1923

Alice Coachman 1923

First Black woman of any nationality to compete in Olympic Games - 1948. Only female American athlete to win a medal of any kind at these Olympics.

Crystal Bird Fauset 1894

Crystal Bird Fauset 1894

First Black American female state legislator in US, 18th District of Philadelphia, 1938.

Frederick Patterson

Frederick Patterson

Son of a slave, owned a carriage company and built a line of cars in 1915.

Sarah Jane Woodson Early 1825

Sarah Jane Woodson Early 1825

First Black woman college instructor in US. She graduated from Oberlin College and began teaching at Wilberforce University in 1858.

Phillis Wheatley 1753

Phillis Wheatley 1753

First published Black American female poet.

Jupiter Hammon 1711

Jupiter Hammon 1711

Although he was born into slavery, in 1761 he became the first Black American writer to be published in the present-day US.

David Ruggles 1810

David Ruggles 1810

First Black bookstore owner and printer in NYC during the 1830s. He was also a leader in the Underground Railroad.

Bessie Coleman 1892

Bessie Coleman 1892

First Black American female pilot to hold a pilot license and an international pilot license.

Tuskegee Airmen

T Airmen

Lt. Charles Hall

Tuskegee Airmen

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